Stutz in the late 1920’s

On February, 17, 1925, Fredrick E. Moskovics (formerly of Remy Electric Company, Nordyke and Marmon, and the H.H. Franklin Company) was named president of the Stutz Motor Car Company, with the provision to proceed with his plans to design, develop, and manufacture a low European chassis with an eight-cylinder overhead cam engine.

1926 Stutz Vertical Eight
1926 Stutz Vertical Eight

The new Vertical Eight Series AA was introduced in January 1926. All models were priced at $2,995. This car was marketed as the Safety Stutz because of its innovation of safety glass windows. Other safety features included four-wheel hydraulic brakes, a low center of gravity, and a strong frame. The base of the car was Charles R. “Pop” Greuter’s 92-horsepower straight-eight engine with chain-driven, single-overhead cam¬shaft, and dual ignition, including two spark plugs per cylinder. The chassis featured an underslung worm-drive differential and centralized chassis lubrication. This configuration allowed the fitting of low built, attractive bodies with safety glass. In 1926, the company set a sales record at 5,069 units.

In late 1926, the Stutz Company formed collaboration with the Weymann American Body Company, a subsidiary of the French Weymann firm. The Weymann American plant manufactured the flexible, fabric-covered body. Reportedly, Stutz helped with some of the plant’s financing and was its largest customer.

1927 Stutz Black Hawk Speedster
1927 Stutz Black Hawk Speedster

In 1927, the Stutz company introduced another new model, the Black Hawk Speedster. The boattailed two passenger speedster had reduced coachwork with scant cycle fenders, step plates replaced the running boards. The models’ fast looks proved to be no illusion when they won the American Automobile Association Stock Car Championship in 1927 and 1928. A privately-entered Black Hawk placed second at the 1928 Twenty-Four Hours of Le Mans after leading the Bentley team much of the way.

That same year, the company newsletter, The Splendid Stutz, announced the optional availability of a dash mounted radio. Stutz introduced the six-cylinder Blackhawk marque starting at $2,345, in January 1929, at the National Automobile Show in New York City. By July, the company reduced the price to $1,995 in hopes of being more competitive in the market.

Moskovics transformed the moribund Indianapolis automobile company into a dynamic producer of advanced luxury performance cars. Along the way, he created a model which even today is a symbol of speed, sport, and the good life of yesteryear.

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