Tag Archives: Indiana Automobile Manufacturers Association

What’s on our Holiday Gift List?

As many of you know, we’ve been quite busy developing items at Cruise-IN.com. As always, these are unique items only available at our shop. Let’s see what’s in the galleries.

We created the next three items to share some of the experiences of auto travel in the early part of the 20th century.

Hoosier Tour Tales of a Pathfinder Motor Manners
Hoosier Tour
A 1913 Indiana to
Pacific Journey
Tales of a
Pathfinder
Motor Manners

Hoosier Tour examines how the 1913 Indiana Automobile Manufacturers’ Association Indiana-Pacific Tour helped generate interest for building roads, like the proposed Ocean-to-Ocean Rock Highway later to be known as the Lincoln Highway. At that time, the IAMA Tour was one of the largest continental tours attempted in the United States.

The Hoosier tourists embarked on a month-long trek from Indianapolis to Los Angeles to promote the Good Roads Movement as well as show that these Indiana-made cars had the stamina to make the trip. They traveled on some decent roads, some completed the night before they arrived, and some that presented some perilous twists.

Hoosier Tour chronicles this trip and provides a glimpse into the hardships and accomplishments they encountered along the way.

More on: Hoosier Tour: A 1913 Indiana to Pacific Journey

Our republished version of the 1921 Tales of a Pathfinder is a beautifully bound chronicle of a true pioneer of early automotive history. Westgard recounts his many adventures in his role as trailblazer for the Good Roads Movement.

In the early part of the 20th century, U.S. highways and byways were in deplorable shape. Rains drenched the dirt roads and often left a gumbo-like substance making travel by cart or car nearly impossible.

For progress to continue, particularly within the automotive industry, we needed better roads. Plus, the Good Roads Movement needed trailblazers to lead the way. Westgard was one of these people.

By the time Tales of a Pathfinder was first published, Westgard had traveled thousands of miles to charter the way west for the automobile to follow. He had endured life-threatening blizzards, scarcity of gasoline stations, and blinding dust storms among other obstacles to his mission.

Tales of a Pathfinder is Westgard’s own story and impressions as he wrote them in 1920.

More on: Tales of a Pathfinder

Our beautifully bound republished version of Motor Manners provides Emily Post’s advice and rules for highway safety. After all, according to Post, “bad motoring manners can be murder.”

Even years after her death, Emily Post is still known as the resource to consult on etiquette in polite society. Her reputation was cemented in history in 1921 when her Book on Etiquette was first published. From that springboard, she developed a syndicated newspaper on etiquette carried by newspapers throughout the United States.

Eventually the National Highway Users Conference approached her to share her advice about motoring on the highways. The result was the pamphlet entitled Motor Manners published in 1949. Although the underlying purpose was to promote highway safety, perhaps the group thought that the influx of female drivers on the road after World War II would respond better to a list of manners rather than a set of rules from a driver’s manual.

This booklet is the republished version of Post’s original writing. The inside pages consist of her advice to the motorists of the 1950’s.

More on: Motor Manners

It is our wish to make finding holiday gift purchases for your auto obsessed friends a lot easier. Check all of these and other items out at our Bookstore.

Hoosier Tour has three national publication reviews

Hoosier Tour

Today we tend to take for granted the convenience of our road system.

We zip along interstates and four-lane highways at speeds carrying us 50-70 miles in about one hour. In 1913, a distance of 100 miles took nearly six to eight hours. Now our roads are generally well-marked, with signs denoting the distance between towns and the turns that take us in the right direction. In 1913, these signs were rare. Plus, although you may gripe about the pot holes forming every year in the street in front of your house, we have nicely paved byways that save on the car’s wear and tear. In 1913, motorists traveled a lot on gravel and dirt, which turned to mud during a rain storm.

In 1913, the inconvenience of our road system was obvious.

But, an intrepid group of Indiana auto makers saw what could be. They envisioned a national system of good roads that could tie the country from coast to coast. They only had to convince the rest of the country.

So, they embarked on a month-long trek from Indianapolis to Los Angeles to promote the Good Roads Movement as well as show that these Indiana-made cars had the stamina to make the trip. They traveled on some decent roads, some completed the night before they arrived, and some that presented some perilous twists.

Hoosier Tour examines how the 1913 Indiana Automobile Manufacturers’ Association Indiana-Pacific Tour helped generate interest for building roads, like the proposed Ocean-to-Ocean Rock Highway later to be known as the Lincoln Highway. At the time, the IAMA Tour was one of the longest continental tours attempted in the United States.

The book examines some of the day-to-day activities and travails as this band of auto pioneers headed west.

Peruse our three reviews at Hoosier Tour: A 1913 Indiana to Pacific Journey

We invite you to learn more about us at cruise-in.com.

Hoosier Tour is one in a series of material by Publishing Resources designed for the auto aficionado. We started our journey with the publication of Cruise IN: A guide to Indiana’s automotive past and present. This publication led to other books and articles relating to car culture, including Indiana Cars: A History of the Automobile in Indiana.

What was happening in Indianapolis on July 1, 1913?

At 2 pm, on July 1, 1913, more 70 people and 20 Indiana-built cars and trucks gathered around the south side of University Park in Indianapolis for the departure of the Indiana Automobile Manufacturers’ Association Indiana-Pacific Tour. At the time, the IAMA Tour was one of the largest transcontinental tours attempted in the United States.

Haynes & Gilbreath
Elwood Haynes, president of Haynes Automobile Company conversing with W. S. Gilbreath, secretary of the Hoosier Motor Club

The 1913 IAMA Tour was designed to promote Indiana-built automobiles to the larger market outside of the Midwest and to generate interest for building better roads. The reawakening Good Roads Movement members felt that the auto industry would only grow when travel by road was made easier. But, investment in roads would only occur when people showed more interest in the automobile industry. IAMA members envisioned a way to help make that happen – a cross country tour to build the country’s interest in automobiles, particularly Indiana’s products, and better roads.

When the IAMA Tour left Indianapolis on July 1, 1913, the Hoosier tourists experienced numerous thunderstorms, crossing the Rocky Mountains and the Western deserts in primitive automobiles that are hard to imagine 100 years later. The tour took 34 days to cover the 3,600 miles and allow for propaganda work and sociability. They passed through Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, and California. Nearly every vehicle accomplished this trek and arrived in Los Angeles after never being more than 24 hours behind schedule.

Marmon No 22
The Lincoln Highway sponsored Marmon was one of the tour participants that made it to California. Left to Right: Capt. Robert Tyndall, Carl G. Fisher, Charles A. Bookwalter, and Heine Scholler.

The 1913 IAMA Indiana-Pacific Tour served as a model of promoting Indiana-built automobiles and generating interest for building roads, like the proposed Ocean-to-Ocean Rock Highway, later to be known as the Lincoln Highway. This road was the impetus to the start of our Federal Highway System.

Previously all roads were developed and maintained by local governments. The first transcontinental highway, the Lincoln Highway, showed the federal government the opportunities brought by linking good roads from coast to coast. We were to arise from the mud onto paved roadways.

Henderson No. 4
Ray Harroun in the Henderson Motor Car entry at California State Capitol in Sacramento

Today we can dash across interstates, from city to city, state to state. This modern-day convenience owes a great deal of thanks to the 1913 IAMA Indiana-Pacific Tour.

For more information on our automotive heritage follow this link.