Tag Archives: Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum

Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum’s “Speakers Series”

The Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum’s “Speakers Series” will kick off in the facility’s new multi-purpose meeting room tomorrow, February 16th @ 4:15 – 6:15 pm.

Dennis E. Horvath with 1928 Auburn 8-88 Speedster
Dennis E. Horvath with 1928 Auburn 8-88 Speedster

As many of you know, I am the kick-off speaker for the “Speakers Series” in conjunction with their exhibition, Indiana Automobiles: Precision Over Production. This exhibition has more than 35 historic, Indiana-built passenger cars, and several iconic race cars honoring Indiana’s automotive history.

My popular presentation “Mileposts in Indiana Automotive History” and other presentations will inform members and guests. Mileposts in Indiana Automotive History shares some of the legends, facts and figures that reflect Indiana’s role in America’s automotive heritage, when marques such as Duesenberg, Stutz and Studebaker propelled the state into a position where the number of Indiana auto manufacturers rivaled Detroit.

Check out my Monday blog posts at Cruise-IN.com documenting some the cars in the exhibit.

See you at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum’s “Speakers Series” tomorrow, February 16th.

For more information and reserve your spot follow this link.

Dennis E. Horvath is speaking at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum

Dennis E. Horvath will kick off the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum’s “Speakers Series” in the facility’s new multi-purpose meeting room on February 16th @ 4:15 – 6:15 pm.

Dennis E. Horvath with 1928 Auburn 8-88 Speedster
Dennis E. Horvath with 1928 Auburn 8-88 Speedster

As many of you know, I have written several books and made numerous presentations about Indiana’s automotive history and culture. I am honored to kick-off the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum’s “Speakers Series” with my popular presentation “Mileposts in Indiana Automotive History” and a discussion at the museum for members and guests.

Mileposts in Indiana Automotive History shares some of the legends, facts and figures that reflect Indiana’s role in America’s automotive heritage, when marques such as Duesenberg, Stutz and Studebaker propelled the state into a position where the number of Indiana auto manufacturers rivaled Detroit.

This presentation is a perfect companion to the museum’s current special exhibition, Indiana Automobiles: Precision Over Production, which currently has more than 35 historic, Indiana-built passenger cars, and several iconic race cars on display. Check out my Monday blog posts at Cruise-IN.com documenting some the cars in the exhibit.

See you at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum’s “Speakers Series” on February 16th.

For more information and reserve your spot follow this link.

Congratulations to Indianapolis Motor Speedway for the Indiana Automobiles show

I must say congratulations to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum for the Indiana Automobiles: Precision over Production show. This show is open now thru March 26, 2017. If you are a historic car-buff, you must see this show.

The museum does a great job presenting this show in honor of Indiana’s Bicentennial celebrating Hoosier automotive production. In partnership with private owners and other automotive museums around the state, more than 35 historic Indiana-built cars like Auburn, Cord, Cole, Duesenberg, Haynes, Marmon, Premier, Studebaker, Stutz, and Waverley are in the exhibit. The galleries are staged as Indianapolis-built cars, Indiana-built cars, and Indiana race cars.

1928 Auburn 8-88 Speedster
1928 Auburn 8-88 Speedster

Over 40 Indiana cities and towns can claim some sort of connection to early automotive history. Approximately 400 firms – large and small – operated statewide between 1894 and 1963.

Many started as carriage builders in the 1800s, several experimenting, by the turn of the 20th century, with internal combustion engines. Many self-trained engineers created one-off “horseless carriage” prototypes in their own shops. The more successful eventually built factories and produced, in quantity, automobiles for sale to the public.

1899 Waverley Electric
1899 Waverley Electric

Providing a proving ground and testing facility for the early automotive industry was the impetus of building of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Not only would the track be available to companies for private testing, but the staging of occasional automobile races would give the firms an opportunity to demonstrate the worth of their products in competition, while the public observed from the grandstands. Companies like Cord, Duesenberg, Marmon, and Stutz continued to use the track to privately test and develop the vehicles they were selling to the public.

The Indiana Automobiles: Precision over Production exhibit tells this story well. The display presents some cars that you might be aware of. One that I especially recall is the 1920 Monroe Model S Touring car produced in Indianapolis by the William Small Company. Gaston Chevrolet won the 1920 Indianapolis 500-mile race in a Monroe designed by his brother Louis and sponsored by William Small.

1932 Cord L-29
1932 Cord L-29

I encourage you to visit the Indiana Automobiles: Precision over Production exhibit to experience Indiana’s automotive legacy.

For more information on our automotive heritage, follow this link.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum showcases Indiana Automobiles

Indiana Automobiles: Precision over Production

As you know, my mission is “Celebrating Indiana Car Culture.” I am happy to announce that in honor of Indiana’s Bicentennial Celebration, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum is presenting a one-of-a-kind exhibition titled “Indiana Automobiles: Precision over Production,” starting on December 6, 2016 thru March 26, 2017

The exhibit is a celebration of legendary Hoosier-built automobiles, such as Cole, Duesenberg, Marmon, Premier, Studebaker and Stutz. More than 35 historic, Indiana-built passenger cars will be on exhibit, some of which will be making their first appearance on display.

1911 Cole Torpedo Roadster
1911 Cole Torpedo Roadster

In addition to the Hoosier-built passenger cars, a few of the most famous Indiana-built race cars will be shown, including IMS co-founder Carl Fisher’s 1905 Premier and the legendary Marmon Wasp that carried Ray Harroun to victory in the first Indianapolis 500 in 1911.

“This exhibit is intended to focus on Indiana’s early, widespread automotive industry, which spurred the development of acres of farmland into the world’s largest sporting facility. Lessons learned at ‘The Greatest Race Course in the World’ made their way into these outstanding passenger cars, which enhanced performance and safety,” said Betsy Smith, executive director of the non-profit Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation that operates the museum located on the Indianapolis Motor Speedway grounds.

I invite you to visit the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum to sample “Celebrating Indiana Car Culture.”

For more information on Indiana cars & companies, follow this link.